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Fundamentals Of Engineering Thermodynamics 9th Edition by Michael J. Moran PDF Download

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Fundamentals of Engineering Thermodynamics 9th Edition, pdf, ebook, and free download by Michael J. Moran, Howard N. Shapiro, Daisie D. Boettner, Margaret B. Bailey become a reference in the world of education. Many basic sciences are important for students to know.

According to Wiley’s page, this book sets the standard for teaching students how to be effective problem solvers. Real-world applications emphasize the relevance of thermodynamics principles to some of the most critical problems and issues of today, including topics related to energy and the environment, biomedical/bioengineering, and emerging technologies.

The Wiley company was the publisher that issued this book on January 4, 2018. Written in English with a total of 584 pages. There is quite a lot of discussion for the basics of engineering science.

Currently, many countries have translated into their language.

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There are 5 formats offered by the Amazon company in selling this book to buyers, namely Kindle PDF eTextbook, Unbound loose-leaf, Unbound loose-leaf book + WileyPLUS access card, Unbound loose-leaf print book + Single-Semester access card, and Unbound loose-leaf print book + access card. Anda bisa memilih sesuai kebutuhan belajar Anda.

The benefit of Engineering science is that it helps humans to make daily life easier. Where by knowing it, humans can process natural resources well.

In addition, the world of health will be helped and currently job vacancies for engineering students are very much sought after by large companies.

To master the science of engineering, you must read this book. Please buy it at the nearest bookstore and read and discuss it with friends at school. The discussion will be better if you involve the teacher.

Table of Contents

1 Getting Started 1

1.1 Using Thermodynamics 2

1.2 Defining Systems 2

1.2.1 Closed Systems 4

1.2.2 Control Volumes 4

1.2.3 Selecting the System Boundary 5

1.3 Describing Systems and Their Behavior 6

1.3.1 Macroscopic and Microscopic Views of Thermodynamics 6

1.3.2 Property, State, and Process 7

1.3.3 Extensive and Intensive Properties 7

1.3.4 Equilibrium 8

1.4 Measuring Mass, Length, Time, and Force 8

1.4.1 SI Units 9

1.4.2 English Engineering Units 10

1.5 Specific Volume 11

1.6 Pressure 12

1.6.1 Pressure Measurement 12

1.6.2 Buoyancy 14

1.6.3 Pressure Units 14

1.7 Temperature 15

1.7.1 Thermometers 16

1.7.2 Kelvin and Rankine Temperature Scales 17

1.7.3 Celsius and Fahrenheit Scales 17

1.8 Engineering Design and Analysis 19

1.8.1 Design 19

1.8.2 Analysis 19

1.9 Methodology for Solving Thermodynamics Problems 20

Chapter Summary and Study Guide 22

2 Energy and the First Law of Thermodynamics 23

2.1 Reviewing Mechanical Concepts of Energy 24

2.1.1 Work and Kinetic Energy 24

2.1.2 Potential Energy 25

2.1.3 Units for Energy 26

2.1.4 Conservation of Energy in Mechanics 27

2.1.5 Closing Comment 27

2.2 Broadening Our Understanding of Work 27

2.2.1 Sign Convention and Notation 28

2.2.2 Power 29

2.2.3 Modeling Expansion or Compression Work 30

2.2.4 Expansion or Compression Work in Actual Processes 31

2.2.5 Expansion or Compression Work in Quasiequilibrium Processes 31

2.2.6 Further Examples of Work 34

2.2.7 Further Examples of Work in Quasiequilibrium Processes 35

2.2.8 Generalized Forces and Displacements 36

2.3 Broadening Our Understanding of Energy 36

2.4 Energy Transfer by Heat 37

2.4.1 Sign Convention, Notation, and Heat Transfer Rate 38

2.4.2 Heat Transfer Modes 39

2.4.3 Closing Comments 40

2.5 Energy Accounting: Energy Balance for Closed Systems 41

2.5.1 Important Aspects of the Energy Balance 43

2.5.2 Using the Energy Balance: Processes of Closed Systems 44

2.5.3 Using the Energy Rate Balance: Steady-State Operation 47

2.5.4 Using the Energy Rate Balance: Transient Operation 49

2.6 Energy Analysis of Cycles 50

2.6.1 Cycle Energy Balance 51

2.6.2 Power Cycles 52

2.6.3 Refrigeration and Heat Pump Cycles 52

2.7 Energy Storage 53

2.7.1 Overview 54

2.7.2 Storage Technologies 54

Chapter Summary and Study Guide 55

3 Evaluating Properties 57

3.1 Getting Started 58

3.1.1 Phase and Pure Substance 58

3.1.2 Fixing the State 58

3.2 p–υ–Relation 59

3.2.1 p–υ–Surface 60

3.2.2 Projections of the p–υ–Surface 61

3.3 Studying Phase Change 63

3.4 Retrieving Thermodynamic Properties 65

3.5 Evaluating Pressure, Specific Volume, and Temperature 66

3.5.1 Vapor and Liquid Tables 66

3.5.2 Saturation Tables 68

3.6 Evaluating Specific Internal Energy and Enthalpy 72

3.6.1 Introducing Enthalpy 72

3.6.2 Retrieving and Data 72

3.6.3 Reference States and Reference Values 74

3.7 Evaluating Properties Using Computer Software 74

3.8 Applying the Energy Balance Using Property Tables and Software 76

3.8.1 Using Property Tables 77

3.8.2 Using Software 79

3.9 Introducing Specific Heats cυ and cp 80

3.10 Evaluating Properties of Liquids and Solids 82

3.10.1 Approximations for Liquids Using Saturated Liquid Data 82

3.10.2 Incompressible Substance Model 83

3.11 Generalized Compressibility Chart 85

3.11.1 Universal Gas Constant, R– 85

3.11.2 Compressibility Factor, 85

3.11.3 Generalized Compressibility Data, Chart 86

3.11.4 Equations of State 89

3.12 Introducing the Ideal Gas Model 90

3.12.1 Ideal Gas Equation of State 90

3.12.2 Ideal Gas Model 90

3.12.3 Microscopic Interpretation 92

3.13 Internal Energy, Enthalpy, and Specific Heats of Ideal Gases 92

3.13.1 Δu, Δhcυ , and cp Relations 92

3.13.2 Using Specific Heat Functions 93

3.14 Applying the Energy Balance Using Ideal Gas Tables, Constant Specific Heats, and Software 95

3.14.1 Using Ideal Gas Tables 95

3.14.2 Using Constant Specific Heats 97

3.14.3 Using Computer Software 98

3.15 Polytropic Process Relations 100

Chapter Summary and Study Guide 102

4 Control Volume Analysis Using Energy 105

4.1 Conservation of Mass for a Control Volume 106

4.1.1 Developing the Mass Rate Balance 106

4.1.2 Evaluating the Mass Flow Rate 107

4.2 Forms of the Mass Rate Balance 107

4.2.1 One-Dimensional Flow Form of the Mass Rate Balance 108

4.2.2 Steady-State Form of the Mass Rate Balance 109

4.2.3 Integral Form of the Mass Rate Balance 109

4.3 Applications of the Mass Rate Balance 109

4.3.1 Steady-State Application 109

4.3.2 Time-Dependent (Transient) Application 110

4.4 Conservation of Energy for a Control Volume 112

4.4.1 Developing the Energy Rate Balance for a Control Volume 112

4.4.2 Evaluating Work for a Control Volume 113

4.4.3 One-Dimensional Flow Form of the Control Volume Energy Rate Balance 114

4.4.4 Integral Form of the Control Volume Energy Rate Balance 114

4.5 Analyzing Control Volumes at Steady State 115

4.5.1 Steady-State Forms of the Mass and Energy Rate Balances 115

4.5.2 Modeling Considerations for Control Volumes at Steady State 116

4.6 Nozzles and Diffusers 117

4.6.1 Nozzle and Diffuser Modeling Considerations 118

4.6.2 Application to a Steam Nozzle 118

4.7 Turbines 119

4.7.1 Steam and Gas Turbine Modeling Considerations 120

4.7.2 Application to a Steam Turbine 121

4.8 Compressors and Pumps 122

4.8.1 Compressor and Pump Modeling Considerations 122

4.8.2 Applications to an Air Compressor and a Pump System 122

4.8.3 Pumped-Hydro and Compressed-Air Energy Storage 125

4.9 Heat Exchangers 126

4.9.1 Heat Exchanger Modeling Considerations 127

4.9.2 Applications to a Power Plant Condenser and Computer Cooling 128

4.10 Throttling Devices 130

4.10.1 Throttling Device Modeling Considerations 130

4.10.2 Using a Throttling Calorimeter to Determine Quality 131

4.11 System Integration 132

4.12 Transient Analysis 135

4.12.1 The Mass Balance in Transient Analysis 135

4.12.2 The Energy Balance in Transient Analysis 135

4.12.3 Transient Analysis Applications 136

Chapter Summary and Study Guide 142

5 The Second Law of Thermodynamics 145

5.1 Introducing the Second Law 146

5.1.1 Motivating the Second Law 146

5.1.2 Opportunities for Developing Work 147

5.1.3 Aspects of the Second Law 148

5.2 Statements of the Second Law 149

5.2.1 Clausius Statement of the Second Law 149

5.2.2 Kelvin–Planck Statement of the Second Law 149

5.2.3 Entropy Statement of the Second Law 151

5.2.4 Second Law Summary 151

5.3 Irreversible and Reversible Processes 151

5.3.1 Irreversible Processes 152

5.3.2 Demonstrating Irreversibility 153

5.3.3 Reversible Processes 155

5.3.4 Internally Reversible Processes 156

5.4 Interpreting the Kelvin–Planck Statement 157

5.5 Applying the Second Law to Thermodynamic Cycles 158

5.6 Second Law Aspects of Power Cycles Interacting with Two Reservoirs 159

5.6.1 Limit on Thermal Efficiency 159

5.6.2 Corollaries of the Second Law for Power Cycles 160

5.7 Second Law Aspects of Refrigeration and Heat Pump Cycles Interacting with Two Reservoirs 161

5.7.1 Limits on Coefficients of Performance 161

5.7.2 Corollaries of the Second Law for Refrigeration and Heat Pump Cycles 162

5.8 The Kelvin and International Temperature Scales 163

5.8.1 The Kelvin Scale 163

5.8.2 The Gas Thermometer 164

5.8.3 International Temperature Scale 165

5.9 Maximum Performance Measures for Cycles Operating Between Two Reservoirs 166

5.9.1 Power Cycles 167

5.9.2 Refrigeration and Heat Pump Cycles 168

5.10 Carnot Cycle 171

5.10.1 Carnot Power Cycle 171

5.10.2 Carnot Refrigeration and Heat Pump Cycles 172

5.10.3 Carnot Cycle Summary 173

5.11 Clausius Inequality 173

Chapter Summary and Study Guide 175

6 Using Entropy 177

6.1 Entropy–A System Property 178

6.1.1 Defining Entropy Change 178

6.1.2 Evaluating Entropy 179

6.1.3 Entropy and Probability 179

6.2 Retrieving Entropy Data 179

6.2.1 Vapor Data 180

6.2.2 Saturation Data 180

6.2.3 Liquid Data 180

6.2.4 Computer Retrieval 181

6.2.5 Using Graphical Entropy Data 181

6.3 Introducing the T dS Equations 182

6.4 Entropy Change of an Incompressible Substance 184

6.5 Entropy Change of an Ideal Gas 184

6.5.1 Using Ideal Gas Tables 185

6.5.2 Assuming Constant Specific Heats 186

6.5.3 Computer Retrieval 187

6.6 Entropy Change in Internally Reversible Processes of Closed Systems 187

6.6.1 Area Representation of Heat Transfer 188

6.6.2 Carnot Cycle Application 188

6.6.3 Work and Heat Transfer in an Internally Reversible Process of Water 189

6.7 Entropy Balance for Closed Systems 190

6.7.1 Interpreting the Closed System Entropy Balance 191

6.7.2 Evaluating Entropy Production and Transfer 192

6.7.3 Applications of the Closed System Entropy Balance 192

6.7.4 Closed System Entropy Rate Balance 195

6.8 Directionality of Processes 196

6.8.1 Increase of Entropy Principle 196

6.8.2 Statistical Interpretation of Entropy 198

6.9 Entropy Rate Balance for Control Volumes 200

6.10 Rate Balances for Control Volumes at Steady State 201

6.10.1 One-Inlet, One-Exit Control Volumes at Steady State 202

6.10.2 Applications of the Rate Balances to Control Volumes at Steady State 202

6.11 Isentropic Processes 207

6.11.1 General Considerations 207

6.11.2 Using the Ideal Gas Model 208

6.11.3 Illustrations: Isentropic Processes of Air 210

6.12 Isentropic Efficiencies of Turbines, Nozzles, Compressors, and Pumps 212

6.12.1 Isentropic Turbine Efficiency 212

6.12.2 Isentropic Nozzle Efficiency 215

6.12.3 Isentropic Compressor and Pump Efficiencies 216

6.13 Heat Transfer and Work in Internally Reversible, Steady-State Flow Processes 218

6.13.1 Heat Transfer 218

6.13.2 Work 219

6.13.3 Work in Polytropic Processes 220

Chapter Summary and Study Guide 222

7 Exergy Analysis 225

7.1 Introducing Exergy 226

7.2 Conceptualizing Exergy 227

7.2.1 Environment and Dead State 227

7.2.2 Defining Exergy 228

7.3 Exergy of a System 228

7.3.1 Exergy Aspects 230

7.3.2 Specific Exergy 230

7.3.3 Exergy Change 232

7.4 Closed System Exergy Balance 233

7.4.1 Introducing the Closed System Exergy Balance 233

7.4.2 Closed System Exergy Rate Balance 236

7.4.3 Exergy Destruction and Loss 237

7.4.4 Exergy Accounting 239

7.5 Exergy Rate Balance for Control Volumes at Steady State 240

7.5.1 Comparing Energy and Exergy for Control Volumes at Steady State 242

7.5.2 Evaluating Exergy Destruction in Control Volumes at Steady State 243

7.5.3 Exergy Accounting in Control Volumes at Steady State 246

7.6 Exergetic (Second Law) Efficiency 249

7.6.1 Matching End Use to Source 249

7.6.2 Exergetic Efficiencies of Common Components 251

7.6.3 Using Exergetic Efficiencies 253

7.7 Thermoeconomics 253

7.7.1 Costing 254

7.7.2 Using Exergy in Design 254

7.7.3 Exergy Costing of a Cogeneration System 256

Chapter Summary and Study Guide 260

Quite a long list of contents of this Fundamentals Of Engineering Thermodynamics pdf. We attach Part of it only. Hope you get the benefits. If you would like to see the full table of contents, please go to the Wiley or Vitalsource page, and Don’t go to the Amazon page.

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About Author

There are 5 scientists who are the authors of this Fundamentals Of Engineering Thermodynamics download. They are people who have knowledge that has been recognized by the college.

They are Michael J. Moran, Howard N. Shapiro, Daisie D. Boettner, Margaret B. Bailey.

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Product Details

Publisher ‏ : ‎ Wiley (WileyPLUS Products); 9th edition (January 4, 2018)

Language ‏ : ‎ English

Ring-bound ‏ : ‎ 584 pages

ISBN-10 ‏ : ‎ 1119391768

ISBN-13 ‏ : ‎ 978-1119391760

Item Weight ‏ : ‎ 2.87 pounds

Dimensions ‏ : ‎ 8.1 x 1.26 x 10.7 inches

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